Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Queens

Title 25. “Understanding Queen Rearing Methods”

"Queen Rearing" lectures often confuse beekeepers, so they don't rear their own queens because they think it is complicated"Understanding Queen Rearing Methods" will explain what the beekeeper is trying to achieve when using one of the "artificial" methods of queen rearing. All we are doing is to help the bees produce queen cells in a controlled way, that makes it easier for the beekeeper to manage. The presentation will be given in a step-by-step manner that is easy to understand, in the hope that it encourages beekeepers to produce their own queens.

Monday, 3 October 2016

2016 Essex Honey Show Results

Class 1 – 1 section comb honey (gift)
1st P.F.Abbott
2nd A.Stark

Class 2 – 1 jar clear honey (gift)
1st V.M.Taylor
2nd P.E.G.Tidmas
3rd W.Gee
VHC J.McNeill
HC P.Rowland
C J.L.Riley

Class 3 – 1 jar set honey (gift)
1st J.French
2nd P.Hughes
3rd J.McNeill
VHC P.F.Abbott
HC M.J.Barke
C P.& A.Wisbey

Class 4 – Pair comb honey sections
1st P.F.Abbott
2nd A.Stark
3rd J.French

Class 5 – Frame of extractable honey
1st J.L.Riley
2nd M.J.Barke
3rd D.Smye
VHC P.E.G.Tidmas
HC P.F.Abbott
C M.Harris

Class 6 – 2 jars light clear honey
1st P.E.G.Tidmas
2nd D.P.Tidmas
3rd M.J.Barke
VHC P.F.Abbott
HC V.M.Taylor
C J.McNeill

Class 7 – 2 jars medium clear honey
1st P.E.G.Tidmas
2nd P.Burge
3rd M.Harris
VHC J.McNeill
HC P.Hughes
C C.Pardoe

Class 8 – 2 jars dark clear honey
1st P.Hughes
2nd J.L.Riley
3rd P.F.Abbott
VHC J.Rushbrook
HC I.Nichols

Class 9 – 2 jars natural set honey
1st J.French
2nd P.F.Abbott

Class 10 – 2 jars soft set honey
1st J.French
2nd W.Gee
3rd J.McNeill
VHC V.M.Taylor

Class 11A – 1 container of cut comb liquid
1st J.French
2nd P.& A.Wisbey
3rd P.F.Abbott

Class 11B – 1 container of cut comb set
1st J.French

Class 12 – 2 jars chunk honey
1st J.French
2nd C.Pardoe
VHC P.F.Abbott

Class 13 – Cake of beeswax
1st V.M.Taylor
2nd M.Harris
3rd C.Pardoe
VHC P.F.Abbott
HC J.Rushbrook
C M.J.Barke

Class 14 – 1 Bottle sweet mead
1st P.F.Abbott
2nd J.McNeill
3rd M.J.Barke
VHC C.Pardoe
HC P.E.Davidson

Class 15 – 1 Bottle dry mead
1st J.McNeill
2nd M.J.Barke
3rd C.Pardoe
VHC S.J.Vickery
HC J.L.Riley
C P.F.Abbott

Class 16 – 2 jars light honey less than 5 years
1st E.Shiner
2nd V.Jepps
3rd D.McCorkindale

Class 17 – 2 jars medium honey less than 5 years
1st P.Hughes
2nd P.N.Saunders
3rd J.M.Pratt

Class 18 – 2 jars dark honey less than 5 years
1st P.Hughes
2nd B.Greenland
3rd D.McCorkindale

Class 19 – Novice 2 jars clear honey
1st V.Jepps
2nd P.Hughes
3rd Z.Bridges
VHC P.E.G.Tidmas
HC D.Adams
C D.P.Tidmas

Class 20 – Novice 2 jars set honey
1st P.Hughes
3rd C.Mayes

Class 21 – Novice cake beeswax
1st E.Shiner
2nd P.Hughes
3rd D.Burge
VHC S.Rushbrook
C V.Jepps

Class 22 – Honey fruit cake
1st J.French
2nd P.Rowland
3rd P.F.Abbott
VHC W.Gee
HC M.J.Barke
C E.McNeill

Class 23 – 6 honey nut cookies
1st V.Jepps
2nd S.R.H.Barke
3rd M.J.Barke
VHC E.Bunting
HC J.M.Prat
C D.P.Tidmas

Class 24 – Honey sandwich
1st S.R.H.Barke
2nd P.Hughes
3rd E.Bunting
VHC M.J.Barke
HC J.M.Prat
C P.& A.Wisbey

Class 25 – 4 apricot & honey scones
1st P.Hughes
2nd S.Andrews
3rd M.Wilson
VHC P.E.G.Tidmas
HC S.R.H.Barke
C E.Bunting
C S.Rushbrook

Class 27 – Junior 6 honey nut cookies
1st S.Collins
2nd A.Collins

Class 28 – Junior honey sandwich
1st D.Holmes
2nd B.Holmes

Class 29 – 6 pieces of fudge
1st J.McNeill
2nd V.Jepps
3rd M.J.Barke
VHC S.R.H.Barke
HC S.Andrews

Class 30 – 6 pieces of toffee
1st S.Andrews
2nd S.R.H.Barke
3rd M.J.Barke
VHC V.Jepps

Class 31 – Honey & malt whole meal loaf
1st S.R.H.Barke
2nd D.P.Tidmas
3rd P.E.G.Tidmas
VHC M.Clay
HC S.J.Vickery
C M.J.Barke

Class 32 – Junior poster
1st H.Hallows
2nd A.Collins
3rd S.Collins

Class 33 – Divisional composite class

1st Braintree
2nd Southend

Class 35 – Pair of candles moulded
1st J.French
2nd M.Wilson
3rd M.Harris
VHC J.McNeill
HC P.F.Abbott
C W.Gee

Class 36 – Pair of candles not moulded
1st P.F.Abbott
2nd J.McNeill
3rd C.Pardoe

Class 37 – Practical invention
1st D.McCorkindale
2nd D.Burge
3rd P.Hughes
VHC J.L.Riley
HC P.F.Abbott

Class 38 – 12 jars clear honey for sale
1st P.E.G.Tidmas
2nd J.McNeill
3rd P.F.Abbott
VHC M.J.Barke

Class 39 – 12 jars set honey fo sale
2nd M.J.Barke
3rd P.F.Abbott

Class 40 – Junior photograph
1st H.Hallows
2rd J.Hallows
3nd L.Harris
VHC S.Collins
HC A.Collins

Class 41 – Photograph
1st P.Hughes
2nd Z.Bridges
3rd J.French
VHC C.Mayes
HC I.Nichols
C D.Burge

Class 42 – Bottle of sweet melomel
1st P.E.Davidson
2nd D.McCorkindale
3rd R.Alabone
VHC J.McNeill
HC M.J.Barke

Class 43 – Bottle of dry melomel
1st M.J.Barke

Class 44 – Bottle of sweet metheglin
2nd M.J.Barke
VHC D.McCorkindale

Class 45 – Bottle of dry metheglin
2nd M.J.Barke

Class 46 – Honey label
1st N.Holmes
2nd M.J.Barke
3rd S.Haley
VHC M.Wilson
HC P.F.Abbott
C J.McNeill

Class 47 – Pair of coloured candles
1st C.Pardoe

Class 50 – Vase of flowers
1st S.Andrews
2nd P.Hughes
3rd V.Jepps
VHC S.Haley
HC J.Wells

Class 51 – Divisional garden
1st Dengie & Maldon
2nd Southend
3rd Romford
VHC Chelmsford
HC Braintree

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Asian Hornet.


Following the finding of Asian hornets in Gloucestershire last week we have received a large number of suspect Asian hornet reports from members of the public and beekeepers which we are following up. Bee inspectors have now visited over 100 sites. Asian hornets have been seen at just six locations within 500 meters of the original site.

Efforts to track down the nest and destroy it are ongoing. There have been no other substantiated reports of hornets anywhere else in the UK so please be patient while we continue our field work and be assured that when appropriate, national alerts will be sent out via our email alert system. In the meantime, our news feed on BeeBase will be used to keep everyone updated.


Please also see the updated ID sheet to help you Identify Vespa velutina in your apiaries: http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?pageId=208. At this time of the year, the best bait to use in traps is fish bait diluted to 25%

Please continue to monitor your own apiaries using hornet traps and encourage those whom you know are not registered on our database to sign in. 

Kind regards,

National Bee Unit.



Monday, 26 September 2016

Divisional Garden wins 1st at 2016 Essex Honey Show!



Plants in Display Garden 2016



Digitalis ssp
Coreopsis “Pineapple Pie”
Hedera helix “Glymii”
Clematis triternata “Rubromarginata”
Salivia “Mystic Spires”
Echinacea spp
Myosotis sylvatica
Sedum ewersii “Rose Carpet”
Rudbeckia fulgida
Dianthus
Ajuga “Rainbow”
Anemone hupehensis Splendens
Salvia patens
Erigeron karvinskianus
Abelia parvifolia “Bumblebee”




The concept of this year’s garden was behind the principle that plants all produce pollen and nectar to a lesser or greater degree.  Some provide just pollen, some just nectar.  The watering cans are symbolic of the flowing nectar and pollen from plants and that these are intrinsically linked to the beautiful flowers that are produced.  All the flowers in this garden are used by bees;  these include solitary bees, bumblebees as well as honeybees.  Ajuga and myositis provide early pollen and nectar and the Hedera late flow honey. Myositis is the smallest of pollens. 

The planting pots are hexagonal linking the notion of honey with the collection of pollen and nectar, fundamental to the collection of each in the production of honey.

All the plants included are easily obtained from a good nursery or garden centre.  Those used were from Meadowcroft SWF, Claremont Maldon


Monday, 29 August 2016

Should we feed honey to our bees?

scout bee (top) comes home and shares her findings with another forager.Credit: Zachary Huang / beetography.com

Honey contains chemicals that could help bees ward off parasites and protect them from pesticide damage, new research suggests.

The findings, published 29 April 2013 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that the immune-boosting chemicals in honey could be a solution to colony-collapse disorder, which has decimated bee populations worldwide.

"The natural honey has components in it that help trigger defenses in the bees," said Jay Evans, a bee pathologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service in Maryland who was not involved in the study.

Mysterious disappearance

Honeybees have been disappearing mysteriously, in a trend known as colony-collapse disorder. Though no one knows exactly what causes the dramatic die-off, scientists think a range of factors, including parasites and pesticides, may be culprits.

Beekeepers often feed bees to get them safely through the winter. Honey may be ideal, but corn syrup is cheaper, so most beekeepers feed bees artificial sweeteners, Evans said. [On the Hunt: Honeybee Scouts Find Food]

To see whether honey provided any benefit to the bees, May Berenbaum, a researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her colleagues identified several chemicals in honey that could play a role in helping bees fight parasites and pesticides.

The researchers then took those chemicals, added them to bee candy — a combination of sucrose and powdered sugar — and fed them to 15 worker bees. Another group got bee candy without any special compounds added. The team then dissected the mid-gut, or small intestine, of the bees, to see which genes were activated.

Bee immunity
The bees that ate the honey chemicals showed activation in genes that are known to help bees fight parasites and break down pesticides, while those who ate the normal bee candy showed no such activation. One particular chemical, p-Coumaric acid, in particular, was tied to the gene activation.

The findings suggest that honey isn't just providing bees with a quick source of "fast food," but is also giving them compounds that keep them healthy.

It also suggests a potential way to strengthen bee colonies.

The researchers then took those chemicals, added them to bee candy — a combination of sucrose and powdered sugar — and fed them to 15 worker bees. Another group got bee candy without any special compounds added. The team then dissected the mid-gut, or small intestine, of the bees, to see which genes were activated.


"P-Coumaric acid may find use as an additive to honey substitutes to allow beekeepers to maintain colonies during food shortages, without compromising the ability of their bees to defend themselves against the pesticides and pathogens that currently bedevil beekeeping in the United States," the researchers wrote in the paper.

That suggestion seems practical, Evans said.

"I don't think we'll get beekeepers to go back to feeding their bees just honey. But scientists should try supplementing the corn syrup with these compounds, and hoping that replaces the good stuff in the honey," Evans told LiveScience.

Although this change alone may not prevent colony collapses, anything that strengthens the bees could help, Evans said.

Follow Tia Ghose on Twitter @tiaghose. Follow LiveScience @livescience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on LiveScience.com.

Perfect plants for pollinators

Looking for plants this autumn for the garden. 

Thinking about pollinators

check out this link first:




Great list of plants from the RHS


and here are a few 
solitary bees and bumblebees 
to look out for:

Ashy mining bee - Adrena cineraria (male) - Louise Hislop, BWARS

Ashy mining bee - Adrena cineraria (female) - Louise Hislop, BWARS

Wool Carder Bee - Anthidium manicatum - Tom Thumb Gardens

Beefly - Denise Stretton, BWARS

Buff tail Bumblebee - Bombus terrestris - naturespot.org.uk

Buff Tail Bumblebee - Bombus terrestris - BBCT


Chocolate miner bee - Adrena caratonica -  Steven Falks, BWARS

Hairy footed Flower Bee - Liz Fenn, Buzzaboutbees.net

Harebell Carpenter Bee - Chelostoma campanularum 


 Red Tail Bumblebee - Bombus lapidarius - Graham Callow, BWARS

Solitary mining bee - Megachile centuncularis - Steven Falk, BWARS

Nomad bee - Nomada rufipes - Steven Falk, BWARS 
Mason bee - Osmia bicornis - Louise Hislop, BWARS

Tuesday, 23 August 2016

T shirts

Interested in purchasing our t-shirt 

Call or text Carlie on 07979862952

Front of t-shirt


Back of t-shirt

Choice of colours:  pale blue or dark blue

Wednesday, 20 July 2016

Beekeeper Sought for Orchard in Witham

Orchard available in Witham
Suitable for beehives
Organic gardener, based in Witham area, is keen to support beekeeping by offering her extended garden as a suitable site for bee hives.


For more information and contact details, please email:

Wednesday, 15 June 2016

Swarms

Have a problem with bees

Call 

Kate on 07801 984446

Call after 6pm or text with a photo


Tuesday, 14 June 2016

The Folly - Apiary at Hatfield Peverel

Our new Apiary at Hatfield Peverel, The Folly, has one colony of bees and a small Nuc. 

The Nuc, a swarm picked up from SWF, is one that will be nurtured before either being handed to a new beekeeper or housed in the second hive. 






Tuesday, 31 May 2016

BIBBA Conference 2016

BIBBA Conference 2016 will be held on 20-22 September on the Isle of Man. Three full days of quality international speakers with lectures on many aspects of beekeeping: from beginner to expert there will be excellent content for all of us to improve our beekeeping.

 

Disease occurrence and spread and future threats to our bees are high profile; now is the time to focus on breeding from the best, locally, for less defensive, robust stocks of honey bees. Where better than a conference with like-minded beekeepers? 

 

Speaker profiles, lecture content summaries and booking are all now available online, links below. Please take a look and whatever you do don’t miss the Early Bee prices, available now. Large choice of accommodation, conference dinner, lots to see, so why not extend your visit? See you there!

 

“This weekend’s conference was excellent and more than met expectations - I hope this sets the standard for future UK beekeeping events and look forward to the next one!” ~ Delegate feedback, Llangollen 2014.

 

bit.ly/ConferenceLinks for direct interactive links

bit.ly/Conf01 for the website, also with full details

 

Trisha Marlow, Publicity Officer, BIBBA